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King’s asks: “What did you read during reading week?”

King's asks: "What did you read during reading week?"

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It’s no secret the King’s community loves books. In the Foundation Year Program alone, first year students read upwards of 50 seminal texts over the course of the year. How did King’s students spend Reading Week, their winter week off from classes? King’s students have a habit of taking things literally, so by reading of course! Here are some of texts King’s students having been enjoying.

“What did you read during reading week?”

Brendan Petrasek

2nd year Sustainability and International Development
Read: script for the play Dybbuk by S. Ansky

“Which I am acting in for the King’s Theatrical Society (KTS)…It’s a very cool story. It’s about a bride who becomes inhabited by the soul of a deceased student, and it’s set in Poland at the end of the 19th century.”

Karina Ricker

Foundation Year Program
Reread: Frankenstein by Mary Shelley

“There’s just so many ways of looking at the text. It’s a very complex and very short book. And thinking about how it’s applicable today is interesting.”

Noah Linton

2nd year Journalism
Read: Slouching Towards Bethlehem by Joan Didion

“I just really like her writing style…she always has an interesting observation or quip to make.”

Jennifer Allott

Alumni (combined honours in Biology and Contemporary Studies)
Read: Eichmann in Jerusalem: A Report on the Banality of Evil (1963) by Hannah Arendt

“It was a controversial book at the time and it continues to be…I would highly recommend it. It’s an interesting look at a well-worn subject.”

Melissa Evans

2nd year Journalism
Read: Brown Girl and the Ring by Nalo Hopkinson

“I had to read it for my World Literature class. It was really good, surprisingly!”

Hannah Perry

2nd year Contemporary Studies and Sociology
Read:The Second Sex by Simone de Beauvoir

“It’s kind of a premier second wave feminism book. Probably, the most popular one from the 20th century.”


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